• Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

    EECS is everywhere. We combine the rigor of science, the power of engineering, and the thrill of discovery. Our students change the world.
  • Two graduate students working with Hari Balkrishnan, the Fujitsu Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, proposed in 2012 a classroom contest challenge in a graduate-level networking course to design protocols for managing congestion in cellular networks. The prize? Coauthorship of a paper describing the contest and its results in the ACM SIGCOMM Computer Communication Review. The winners? Four undergraduates, João Batalha ’13, Ameesh Goyal ’14, Somak Das ’14, and Joshua Ma ’14, and the two graduate students, Keith Winstein, now assistant professor at Stanford University and Anirudh Sivaraman, who proposed the idea. Read more!
  • Getting to the source of data-visualization aberrations is a big problem in big data. EECS doctoral student Eugene Wu with Sam Madden, professor of computer science and engineering in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have released a new tool, called DBWipes, that pinpoints aberrations and determines which data sources to investigate. Read more.
  • David Perreault is professor of electrical engineering, associate EECS Department head and head of the Power Electronics Research Group and he and his group have been and are focused on efficiency — how to improve power conversion in the face of an 80 percent rise in demand through 2030. Read more.
  • A team led by Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) researchers including EECS associate professor Wojciech Matusik and project lead and doctoral candidate Adriana Schulz has developed “Fab By Example,” the first data-driven method to help people design products, with a growing database of templates that allow users to customize thousands of complex items — without the need to understand the mechanical engineering that might normally be expected. The team will be presenting its system at this month’s Siggraph graphics conference. Read more.
  • Sangeeta Bhatia, the John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science has developed a new technique for studying the lifecycle of the hepatitis B virus. This work could lead to discovery of effective cure for a disease that affects roughly 400 million people worldwide. Read more.
  • Researchers at MIT -- including EECS graduate student Abe Davis and EECS faculty members Fredo Durand and Bill Freeman, and members of the Computer Graphics Group in MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have collaborated with colleagues at Microsoft and Adobe to develop an algorithm to reconstruct an audio signal produced by practically invisible vibrations of objects filmed in video and normally inaudible to human hearing. Read more.
  • A research group that includes Electrical Engineering and Computer Science professor Srini Devadas of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Frontier Award, as part of nearly $75 million that the NSF’s Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace program will spend on cybersecurity projects across the country, the foundation announced on July 31. Read more.
  • The National Institutes of Health has awarded eight grants as part of a new phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project to study the role that genomic variation plays in modulating gene expression and ultimately human disease. Prof. Manolis Kellis, one of the awardees will lead the MIT project. Read more.
  • Paying attention to the data that says MOOC learning is limited because of high drop rates and other negatives, CSAIL researchers have noted that students need help learning how to watch the videos and these researchers have developed a new way for students to learn how to watch MOOC videos called LectureScape. Read more.
  • Anantha Chandrakasan, Department Head of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT recently acknowledged the contributions of three faculty members who served as part of the Department Leadership Group (DLG) since July 1, 2011. Saman Amarasinghe and Jacob White, both served as co-education officers and Steven Leeb, as undergraduate laboratory officer. Chandrakasan also welcomed the new DLG members (since July 1, 2014) including co-education officers Hae-Seung “Harry” Lee, Rob Miller and undergraduate laboratory officer Karl K. Berggren. Read more.