EECS energy logo News & Events EECSenergy Classes EECSenergy Faculty MITEI Links
Lighting

EECSenergy home Energy generation & storage > Thermoelectrics > Solar Photovoltaics > Thermophotovoltaics > Turbine projects > Micro Energy Harvesters > Storage Energy Efficiency > Lighting> Energy use: architectural > Energy use: electronic devices > Electricity Transmission > Electric Machines > Transportation Energy Reports & Resources EECSenergy Teaching

 

Lighting accounts for approximately 30% of US electricity use. Work within EECS at MIT aims to replace inefficient light sources with efficient solid state light emitting devices. The potential benefit is significant. For example, applications requiring high quality light sources (with color rendering indices above 90) presently employ incandescent bulbs with power efficiencies of only 15-20 lm/W.

Organic Light Emitting Devices
Marc Baldo

We are fabricating very high efficiency organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with power efficiencies exceeding 24 lm/W. To obtain light emission from all excited states within the devices, we employ either phosphorescence, a technique that we helped pioneer, or our new technique called extraflourescence, which employs spin mixing to enhance efficiencies. In addition, we have performed detailed optical modeling and techniques that allow enhanced light coupling out of our OLEDs. Read more about this work at: http://softsemi.mit.edu/Research.

Fig. 11. (below). A prototype white light panel developed by General Electric and composed of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The panel is 2 feet square and generates 1200 lumens. OLED technology promises high quality white light with less wasted energy than traditional incandescent sources. Image courtesy Joe Shiang at GE.

A prototype white light panel developed by General Electric and composed of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). The panel is 2’ square and generates 1200 lumens. OLED technology promises high quality white light with less wasted energy than traditional incandescent sources. Image courtesy Joe Shiang at GE.

Quantum Dot Light Emitting Devices
Vladimir Bulovic

We are developing white-light emitting quantum dot LEDs (QD-LEDs) for use as planar white-light sources in future solid-state lighting. Our white QD-LEDs consist of organic charge transport layers with a QD monolayer sandwiched between them. By mixing various amounts of high quantum yield QDs, we demonstrate white QD-LEDs with color coordinates that vary only slightly with applied bias. Read more about this work at: http://www.rle.mit.edu/organic/.

fig.9. White quantum dot light emitting devices and schematics of the device structure and re green and blue quantum dotsFig. 12. White quantum dot light emitting devices (QE-LEDs) together with schematics of the device structure and red green and blue quantum dots.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dual-Use Electronics to Enhance Energy Efficiency: Intelligent Lighting Control
Steven B. Leeb

The prevalence of electric discharge illumination has led us to consider ways to inexpensively use discharge lamps to enhance energy savings in buildings, both through lighting optimization and through "non-conventional" uses of the ubiquitous fluorescent lamp fixture. We are exploring a wide range of research to add functionality and energy savings to the lighting infrastructure. For example, we have developed a proximity sensing lamp ballast that can detect the presence of people near the light. The ballast can automatically dim and brighten lighting as people move through a building. In sparsely populated areas, a person travels in a "pool" of light. We are also developing ballasts that modulate the arc in a lamp, permitting the lamp to transmit information optically while retaining conventional illumination capability.

Fig. 13. A demonstration of proximity sensing for intelligent lighting control.

fig.10. A demonstration of proximity sensing for intelligent lighting control
EECS Home Page | Site Map | Search | About this page | Comments and inquiries welcome

bio EECS EECSenergy nano EECS MIT homepage MIT Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science MIT Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science