IAP 2020

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IAP 2020 For-Credit Subjects:

 

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

 

See Course 6 Non-Credit Activities here.

 

 

6.037   Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs: Zombies drink caffeinated

Mike Phillips

TuTh 7pm-9pm in 32-044

Meets Jan 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, and 30

 

Preregister on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed with space permitting.

Prerequisites: some programming experience; high confusion threshold.

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F

 

Cosponsored by the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB)

 

Studies the structure and interpretation of computer programs which transcend specific programming languages. Demonstrates thought patterns for computer science using Scheme. Includes weekly programming projects. Enrollment may be limited.

This fast-paced course covers the material in the classic book Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs -- a class previously known at MIT as 6.001. It uses Scheme to introduce students to principles of computation, and to teach thought patterns for computer science. Students are taught to apply structural, procedural, and meta-linguistic abstraction to solve computational problems. Four projects, one per week, will be assigned and graded.

Cosponsored by the Student Information Processing Board.

 

Web: http://web.mit.edu/alexmv/6.037/

 

Contact: Mike Phillips, 6.001-zombies@mit.edu


 

 

6.057   Introduction to MATLAB

Aaron Wubshet and Orhan Celiker

Meets Mon Jan 27 to Fri Jan 31 7pm-9pm in 32-123

Office Hours 1pm-3pm, 10-250

 

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting

Prereq: None

Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F  

 

 

Accelerated introduction to MATLAB and its popular toolboxes. Lectures are interactive, with students conducting sample MATLAB problems in real time. Includes problem-based MATLAB assignments. Students must provide their own laptop and software. Great preparation for classes that use MATLAB.

 

Web: https://learning-modules.mit.edu/class/index.html?uuid=/course/6/ia18/6.057

 

Contact: Orhan Celiker, 6.057-staff@mit.edu


 

 

6.058   Introduction to Signals, Systems, and Feedback Control -- Preparation for 6.003

Rhian Chavez

Jan 6 to Jan 31

Meets MTuTh, January 6-9; 13- 16; 20-23; 27-30; 7pm-8:30pm, 34-301

 

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting

Prereq: linear algebra or differential equations

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   

Limited to 30 participants.

 

Preparation for 6.003 or 6.011, focusing on several key concepts, including LTI systems, convolution, correlation, continuous and discrete Fourier series and transforms, filtering, sampling, modulation, Laplace and z-transforms, feedback/feedforward, and Bode plots. Intended to prepare students for 6.003 but could also serve as a refresher for 6.011. Course will include three problem sets and no exam.

 


Contact: rhianc@mit.edu.

 

6.117   Introduction to Electrical Engineering Lab Skills

            Sam Chinnery, Tim Magoun, Savannah Inglin

            Meets MW Jan 15- Jan 31; TBA

           

Preregister on Websis; no listeners permitted

Prereq: None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F

Limited to 17 participants; priority given to first-year students

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of practical electrical engineering (EE) in a relaxed, project-oriented environment. There are no prerequisites for this class; the only requirements are creativity and an interest in EE.

 

 


 

 

6.146   Mobile Autonomous Systems Laboratory: MASLAB

Noah Moroze, Yang Yan, Claire Traweek, Juan Salazar, Erons Ohienmhen

Meets January 6 - January 31 10am - 11pm; 38-600

 

Preregister on WebSIS and fill out form at maslab website. No listeners allowed.

Prereq:  None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Limited to 50 participants.

 

Autonomous robotics contest emphasizing technical AI, vision, mapping and navigation from a robot-mounted camera. Few restrictions are placed on materials, sensors, and/or actuators, enabling teams to build robots very creatively. Teams should have members with varying engineering, programming and mechanical backgrounds. Culminates with a robot competition at the end of IAP. The course begins with a week of instruction intended to serve the competitors as they start to design and prototype their systems. The bulk of the course consists of spending time in the lab building robots. This course is a great choice for all of those who would like to get hands-on experience in working on a team project. Enrollment is limited.

 

Web: http://maslab.mit.edu/

Contact: maslab-staff@mit.edu


 

 

6.147   The Battlecode Programming Competition

Diana Ma, Nate Foss, Arvid Lunnemark, Adam Zheng, Anne Ouyang, Ashley Lin, Crystal Su, Cynthia Du, Elizabeth Zou, Ivy Wang, Jerry Mao, Jett Wang, Marco Nocito, Nathan Kim, Pranali Vani, Quinn Bowers, Shayna Ahteck, Stephanie Fu, Teresa Gao, Vincent Huang, Younghun Roh, Zoë Marschner

Meets Mon-Fri, Jan 6-10, 13-17, 7:00pm-9:00pm, 32-155;

Final competition Feb 1, 6pm, TBA

 

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners welcome at individual sessions

Prereq: 6.0001

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit

 

Artificial Intelligence programming contest in Java. Student teams program virtual robots to play Battlecode, a real-time strategy game. Assumes basic knowledge of programming, but not Java—lectures are held for the first two weeks to teach people the basics of Java and how to make your robots do intelligent things. Two teams of virtual robots, controlled by your code, roam the map gathering the resources necessary to build your army and win. Contestants learn to use artificial intelligence heuristics, pathfinding, and distributed algorithms. Competition culminates in a live Battlecode tournament.

 

Battlecode is a great opportunity to have fun and rapidly develop important software skills such as building a codebase from scratch, managing a large software system, and getting hands-on Java experience. For beginners, our lecture series (with dinner) walks you through creating your first bots and teaches more advanced techniques, and the Newbie Tournament—for first-time participants only—has its own share of the $30,000 prize pool.

Compete in teams of one to four students. First-year students are encouraged to participate. Learn more at battlecode.org. Lectures are optional but helpful. Knowledge of real-time strategy games or artificial intelligence is not necessary.

 

Web: https://battlecode.org

 

Contact: Nate Foss, battlecode@mit.edu


 

 

 

6.148   Web Lab: A Web Programming Class and Competition

Jessica Tang, Nikhil Singhil, Aaron Sipser, Alex Chen, Matthew Farejowicz, Cory Lynch

Meets MTuThF Jan 7-17, 11 am to 3 pm 10-250;

The remaining two weeks comprise grading, judging, and hackathons

Office Hours MW TBA Awards Ceremony TBA

 

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting.

Prereq: None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Limited to 250 participants.

 

Students for teams of 1-3 people and learn how to build a functional and user-friendly website. Lectures and workshops teach everything you need to make a complete website. Advanced topics include React.js, layouts, and security. All teams eligible to enter in competition. Sites will be judged by industry experts. Over $20K in prizes will be awarded!

 

Beginners and experienced web programmers welcome, but previous programming experience recommended. You will receive the instructor's permission automatically by coming to lecture or by passing the first milestone check-off.

 

Web: http://weblab.mit.edu

Contact:  weblab-staff@mit.edu


 

 

6.176   Pokerbots Competition

David Amirault, Stephen Otremba, Nilai Sarda

Meets January 6, 8, 10, 13, 15, 17 1:00pm- 2:30pm, 4-370.  

Final presentation January 31.

 

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend a class in the first week. Listeners allowed, space permitting.

Prereq: Any programming language, recommend Python, C/C++, or Java;

 no poker experience needed

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Limited to 150 participants.

 

Build autonomous poker players and acquire the knowledge of the game of poker. Showcase decision making skills, apply concepts in mathematics, computer science and economics. Provides instruction in programming, game theory, probability and statistics and machine learning. Concludes with a final competition and prizes. Pokerbots is a programming competition where teams of up to four students build autonomous poker players. Learn and apply concepts in mathematics, computer science, and economics not normally taught together in classes. Poker has become a cultural phenomenon: learn the intricacies of the game and showcase your decision-making skills. As a game of incomplete information, poker is an interesting problem because of its complex dynamics and real-world applications, such as trading. We'll have over $20,000 in prizes from some of the best technology and finance firms.

 

There will be five lectures in which students will learn programming, game theory, bankroll management, probability and statistics, and machine learning, and how to put them all together to make a successful pokerbot.

 

Web: http://pokerbots.mit.edu/

Contact:  pokerbots@mit.edu


 

 

6.S086 Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI

Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel

 

Meets TuTh Jan 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 11:30am- 1:30 pm, 34-304

 

Sign up in advance by January 7th, and preregister on WebSIS. Listeners permitted.

Prereq: linguistics, acoustic or psycholinguistics or speech science background suggested

Level: U (6 units) Graded P/D/F

 

This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation.

 

 

Cosponsored with HST.

Contact Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel, sshuf@mit.edu.

 


 

 

6.S087 Mathematical Methods for Multidimensional Statistics

Farrell Eldrian Wu, Basil Saeed

MWF 1/6/20-1/29/20, 2:00-3:30pm; ROOM TBD

Prereq: 6.041A, 18.02.

Level: U (6 units) Graded P/D/F

 

Covers the mathematical foundations behind many of the methods used in multi-dimensional statistics, machine learning and data science. This includes multidimensional functions and spaces, vector and matrix calculus, constrained and unconstrained optimization and matrix decompositions.  Lectures develop the theoretical foundations of these concepts, while problem sets provide examples of their applications to statistics and machine learning. 6.041B helpful.

 

Contact: 6s087-staff@mit.edu


 

 

6.S088 Programming Enterprise Applications with Ballerina & WSO2 in Sri Lanka

Prof. Saman Amarasinghe, Dr. Sanjiva Weerawarana

 

Prereq: Programming Experience

Level: U  6 units P/D/F

Enrollment Limited to 10 participants. Advanced Sign-Up Required.

Students will travel to Sri Lanka

 

Ballerina is a concurrent, transactional, strongly typed programming language. It provides all the functionality expected of a modern, general-purpose programming language, but it is designed specifically for integration: it brings fundamental concepts, ideas and tools of distributed system integration into the language with direct support for providing and consuming network services, distributed transactions, reliable messaging, stream processing, security, and workflows.

 

This class will cover the following topics:

 

·      Introduction to Ballerina

·      Architecture of scalable enterprise systems

·      Enterprise application security

·      Writing microservices

·      APIs and integrating applications

·      Scalable deployment architectures

·      Devops

 

Students will develop a practical scale system through the course of the class with the intention of a future completed version going live. Students will gain first-hand experience of Sri Lanka where this programming language is being developed. This immersive experience brings MIT students and Sri Lankan students together for an intense month of study and exploration. Explore Sri Lanka’s heritage, culture, natural beauty, and people. Through this MISTI IAP program, you learn cross-cultural communication by living and working together with Sri Lanka students, and software engineers. As part of the team building and country orientation, the program starts of by visiting key cultural, heritage, historic, and wildlife sites in Sri Lanka. All expenses covered by sponsors.

 

More at https://goo.gl/Ei34Qj

Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MIT India Program,

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

 


Contact: Mala Ghosh, E40-423, (617) 452-2479, mghosh@mit.edu

 

 

6.S089 Introduction to Quantum Computing

Amir Karamlou

MWF 3pm-5pm

Meets Jan; 36-155

 

Preregister on WebSIS and email instructor. Listeners permitted.

Prereq:  None

(U) 6 units Graded P/D/F

 

Quantum computation is a growing field at the intersection of physics, computer science, electrical engineering and applied math. This course provides an introduction to the basics of quantum computation. Specifically, we will cover some fundamental quantum mechanics (first week), survey quantum circuits (second week), and introduce important quantum algorithms (third week). In the final week we will survey advanced topics such as quantum error correction and quantum communication as well as applications to fields ranging from machine learning to chemistry. This course is self-contained and does not require any prior knowledge of quantum mechanics.

 

Contact Amir Karamlou, karamlou@mit.edu


 

 

6.S092 Crash Course for 6.006 Intro to Algorithms in 6+0+0+6 Hours

Ivan Ferreira Antunes Filho

January TBA, TBA

 

Preregister on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting.

Prereq: some knowledge of proofs

Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F

 

Cosponsored by the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB)

 

An overview of topics covered in 6.006, taught by experienced TAs, geared toward people who have some proofs knowledge, and want to prepare to take the class in the Spring, get some experience for algorithm questions in interviews, or who are curious about learning what all the hype is around algorithms. We will be covering topics like sort, data structures, hashing, graph search, and dynamic programming.

Contact ivanaf@mit.edu


 

 

6.S185 Wi-Fi 101

Prof. Steven B. Leeb, Patrick Kane (Cypress Semiconductor)

January TBA, 38-501 Engineering Design Studio

 

Preregister on WebSIS; Advanced Sign-Up Required

Permission of Instructor Required

Participants must attend all sessions

Prereq: Short readings before seminar meetings Permission of Instructor Required

Level: U3 units Graded P/D/F  

Limited to 30 participants.

 

This will be a three-day in-depth class focused on creating an IoT device using a Cypress WICED

Wi-Fi development kit and shield. Students will receive instruction, complete exercises, and

homework to learn about the WICED Wi-Fi development environment and system, and the

basics of Wi-Fi and the TCP/IP Network Stack, including TLS security. Exercises involve

interacting with the outside world using buttons, LED's, displays, and analog sensors for

temperature, humidity, and ambient light. "Cloud" applications protocols for communication

will be discussed. Each student will build an IoT weather station that senses local weather

conditions and publishes them on the web. Students will build a final project of their own

design that involves sensor(s) and actuators and pushing sensor data to a cloud client. Some

experience with C helpful.

 

Email sbleeb@mit.edu for permission before registering on WebSIS. Registering for this course is a FIRM commitment to attend; others will be turned away to make room for you.

 

Sponsor(s): Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

 

Contact sbleeb@mit.edu.


 

 

6.S187 Code for Good

Victoria Juan

Jan 6-10, 13-17, 21-24, 27-31 time TBA; afternoon office hours 4 days a week; dinner and team presentations every Friday

 

Preregister on WebSIS.

Prerequisite: programming experience necessary

Level: U 6 unites

Graded P/D/F. Can be repeated for credit

Limited to 50 participants.

 

6.S187 provides opportunities for students to work on software-related projects with nonprofit organizations and provides them with technical expertise. Teams of 3-5 students will be matched with a nonprofit that has a project that is of interest to the student. Students will be mentored by a representative from the organization and subject instructors. Students can sign up as individuals or in groups. Project listings and detailed information available on the website:

 

http://codeforgood.mit.edu/programs/iap-class/   

 

Apply at http://codeforgood.mit.edu/apply

Contact: codeforgood@mit.edu


 

 

6.S190 Rapid Application Development

Daniela Field

Jan22 – Jan31, MWF 3pm-4pm, 34-303

 

Preregister on WebSIS and at url below by January 16th

NO CLASS MON 1/21 FOR MLK DAY

No Coding Required.

Equipment: Windows laptop or Mac running a tool like Parallels

Limited to 25 people.

 

Rapid Application Development (RAD) using high productivity visual development platforms is fast becoming a standard in the enterprise. In this course, you will learn how to build web and mobile applications without having to write code.

 

Upon completion of this course, you will gain an understanding of the basics of app development and have a sandbox for testing out new ideas. In addition, you will have an opportunity to take a rapid application developer certification exam and earn some bragging rights.

 

Sign up online at https://mitrad.mendixcloud.com/

 

Contact: jeffrey.goldberg@mendix.com


 

 

6.S191 Introduction to Deep Learning

Alexander Amini, Ava Soleimany

Mon Jan 27 - Fri Jan 31 1p-4pm, Room 32-123

 

Preregister on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed

Prereq:  6.008 or 6.036 or 6.034 or 6.867 or equivalent experience in Machine Learning

Level U, 3 units, Graded P/D/F

Limited to 250

 

Intro to deep learning methods with applications to machine translation, image recognition, game playing, image generation and more. A collaborative course incorporating labs in TensorFlow and peer brainstorming along with lectures. Course concludes with project proposals with feedback from staff and panel of industry sponsors.

 

URL: http://introtodeeplearning.com

 

Contact: introtodeeplearning@mit.edu


 

 

 

 

IAP 2020 For-Credit Subjects:

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

See Course 6 Non-Credit Activities

________________________________________

6.037  Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs: Zombies drink caffeinated

 

Mike Phillips

TuTh 7pm-9pm in 32-044

Meets Jan 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, and 30

Preregister on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed with space permitting.

Prerequisites: some programming experience; high confusion threshold.

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F

Cosponsored by the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB)

Studies the structure and interpretation of computer programs which transcend specific programming languages. Demonstrates thought patterns for computer science using Scheme. Includes weekly programming projects. Enrollment may be limited. This fast-paced course covers the material in the classic book Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs -- a class previously known at MIT as 6.001. It uses Scheme to introduce students to principles of computation, and to teach thought patterns for computer science. Students are taught to apply structural, procedural, and meta-linguistic abstraction to solve computational problems. Four projects, one per week, will be assigned and graded.

Cosponsored by the Student Information Processing Board.

Web: http://web.mit.edu/alexmv/6.037/

Contact: Mike Phillips, 6.001-zombies@mit.edu


 

6.057  Introduction to MATLAB

 

Aaron Wubshet and Orhan Celiker

Meets Mon Jan 27 to Fri Jan 31 7pm-9pm in 32-123

Office Hours 1pm-3pm, 10-250

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting

Prereq: None

Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F  

Accelerated introduction to MATLAB and its popular toolboxes. Lectures are interactive, with students conducting sample MATLAB problems in real time. Includes problem-based MATLAB assignments. Students must provide their own laptop and software. Great preparation for classes that use MATLAB.

Web: https://learning-modules.mit.edu/class/index.html?uuid=/course/6/ia18/6.057

Contact: Orhan Celiker, 6.057-staff@mit.edu


 

6.058  Introduction to Signals, Systems, and Feedback Control -- Preparation for 6.003

 

Rhian Chavez

Jan 6 to Jan 31

Meets MTuTh, January 6-9; 13- 16; 20-23; 27-30; 7pm-8:30pm, 34-301

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting

Prereq: linear algebra or differential equations

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   

Limited to 30 participants.

Preparation for 6.003 or 6.011, focusing on several key concepts, including LTI systems, convolution, correlation, continuous and discrete Fourier series and transforms, filtering, sampling, modulation, Laplace and z-transforms, feedback/feedforward, and Bode plots. Intended to prepare students for 6.003 but could also serve as a refresher for 6.011. Course will include three problem sets and no exam.


Contact: rhianc@mit.edu.

6.117 Introduction to Electrical Engineering Lab Skills

 

            Sam Chinnery, Tim Magoun, Savannah Inglin

            Meets MW Jan 15- Jan 31; TBA         

Preregister on Websis; no listeners permitted

Prereq: None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F

Limited to 17 participants; priority given to first-year students

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of practical electrical engineering (EE) in a relaxed, project-oriented environment. There are no prerequisites for this class; the only requirements are creativity and an interest in EE.


 

6.146  Mobile Autonomous Systems Laboratory: MASLAB

 

Noah Moroze, Yang Yan, Claire Traweek, Juan Salazar, Erons Ohienmhen

Meets January 6 - January 31 10am - 11pm; 38-600

Preregister on WebSIS and fill out form at maslab website. No listeners allowed.

Prereq:  None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Limited to 50 participants.

Autonomous robotics contest emphasizing technical AI, vision, mapping and navigation from a robot-mounted camera. Few restrictions are placed on materials, sensors, and/or actuators, enabling teams to build robots very creatively. Teams should have members with varying engineering, programming and mechanical backgrounds. Culminates with a robot competition at the end of IAP. The course begins with a week of instruction intended to serve the competitors as they start to design and prototype their systems. The bulk of the course consists of spending time in the lab building robots. This course is a great choice for all of those who would like to get hands-on experience in working on a team project. Enrollment is limited.

Web: http://maslab.mit.edu/

Contact: maslab-staff@mit.edu


 

6.147  The Battlecode Programming Competition

 

Diana Ma, Nate Foss, Arvid Lunnemark, Adam Zheng, Anne Ouyang, Ashley Lin, Crystal Su, Cynthia Du, Elizabeth Zou, Ivy Wang, Jerry Mao, Jett Wang, Marco Nocito, Nathan Kim, Pranali Vani, Quinn Bowers, Shayna Ahteck, Stephanie Fu, Teresa Gao, Vincent Huang, Younghun Roh, Zoë Marschner

Meets Mon-Fri, Jan 6-10, 13-17, 7:00pm-9:00pm, 32-155;

Final competition Feb 1, 6pm, TBA

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners welcome at individual sessions

Prereq: 6.0001

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit

Artificial Intelligence programming contest in Java. Student teams program virtual robots to play Battlecode, a real-time strategy game. Assumes basic knowledge of programming, but not Java—lectures are held for the first two weeks to teach people the basics of Java and how to make your robots do intelligent things. Two teams of virtual robots, controlled by your code, roam the map gathering the resources necessary to build your army and win. Contestants learn to use artificial intelligence heuristics, pathfinding, and distributed algorithms. Competition culminates in a live Battlecode tournament.

Battlecode is a great opportunity to have fun and rapidly develop important software skills such as building a codebase from scratch, managing a large software system, and getting hands-on Java experience. For beginners, our lecture series (with dinner) walks you through creating your first bots and teaches more advanced techniques, and the Newbie Tournament—for first-time participants only—has its own share of the $30,000 prize pool.

Compete in teams of one to four students. First-year students are encouraged to participate. Learn more at battlecode.org. Lectures are optional but helpful. Knowledge of real-time strategy games or artificial intelligence is not necessary.

Web: https://battlecode.org

Contact: Nate Foss, battlecode@mit.edu


 

6.148  Web Lab: A Web Programming Class and Competition

 

Jessica Tang, Nikhil Singhil, Aaron Sipser, Alex Chen, Matthew Farejowicz, Cory Lynch

Meets MTuThF Jan 6-17, 11 am to 3 pm 10-250;

The remaining two weeks comprise grading, judging, and hackathons

Office Hours MW TBA Awards Ceremony TBA

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting.

Prereq: None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Limited to 250 participants.

Students for teams of 1-3 people and learn how to build a functional and user-friendly website. Lectures and workshops teach everything you need to make a complete website. Advanced topics include React.js, layouts, and security. All teams eligible to enter in competition. Sites will be judged by industry experts. Over $20K in prizes will be awarded!

Beginners and experienced web programmers welcome, but previous programming experience recommended. You will receive the instructor's permission automatically by coming to lecture or by passing the first milestone check-off.

Web: http://weblab.mit.edu

Contact:  weblab-staff@mit.edu


 

6.176  Pokerbots Competition

David Amiraul, Shreyas Srinivasan, Stephen Otremba, Nilai Sarda, Gabrial Ramirez, Andy Zhu, Haijia Wan

Meets January 6, 8, 10, 13, 15, 17 1:00pm- 2:30pm, 4-370.  

Final presentation January 31.

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend a class in the first week. Listeners allowed, space permitting.

Prereq: Recommend 6.0001 or knowledge of Java, C/C++. No poker experience needed.

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

6.176 is a computerized poker tournament. Teams of one to four students compete over the month to build the best possible autonomous poker player for our poker variant announced at the start of IAP. Showcase your programming and strategy skills, applying concepts from math, computer science, and game theory to win prizes from this year's $30,000 plus prize pool! Class provides instruction in bot programming, game theory, probability and statistics, and machine learning, over six lectures which take place during the first two weeks of IAP. Attendance not mandatory but highly encouraged; lecture notes are distributed through the course for people who wish to participate remotely. Concludes with a final competition event on January 31 and prizes. Sponsored by many of the world's top quantitative trading firms.

 

Web: https://pokerbots.org

Contact:  pokerbots@mit.edu


 

6.S086            Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI

 

Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel

Meets TuTh Jan 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, 29, 31, 11:30am- 1:30 pm, 34-304

Sign up in advance by January 7th, and preregister on WebSIS. Listeners permitted.

Prereq: linguistics, acoustic or psycholinguistics or speech science background suggested

Level: U (6 units) Graded P/D/F

This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation.

Cosponsored with HST.

Contact Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel, sshuf@mit.edu.


 

6.S087            Mathematical Methods for Multidimensional Statistics

             

               Farrell Eldrian Wu, Basil Saeed

MWF 1/6/20-1/29/20, 2:00-3:30pm; ROOM TBD

Prereq: 6.041A, 18.02.

Level: U (6 units) Graded P/D/F

Covers the mathematical foundations behind many of the methods used in multi-dimensional statistics, machine learning and data science. This includes multidimensional functions and spaces, vector and matrix calculus, constrained and unconstrained optimization and matrix decompositions.  Lectures develop the theoretical foundations of these concepts, while problem sets provide examples of their applications to statistics and machine learning. 6.041B helpful.

Contact: 6s087-staff@mit.edu


 

6.S088            Programming Enterprise Applications with Ballerina & WSO2 in Sri Lanka

 

Prof. Saman Amarasinghe, Dr. Sanjiva Weerawarana

Prereq: Programming Experience

Level: U  6 units P/D/F

Enrollment Limited to 10 participants. Advanced Sign-Up Required.

Students will travel to Sri Lanka

Ballerina is a concurrent, transactional, strongly typed programming language. It provides all the functionality expected of a modern, general-purpose programming language, but it is designed specifically for integration: it brings fundamental concepts, ideas and tools of distributed system integration into the language with direct support for providing and consuming network services, distributed transactions, reliable messaging, stream processing, security, and workflows.

This class will cover the following topics:

 


  • Intro to Ballerina

  • Architecture of scalable enterprise systems

  • Enterprise application security

  • Writing microservices

  • APIs and integrating applications

  • Scalable deployment architecture

  • Devops

 

Students will develop a practical scale system through the course of the class with the intention of a future completed version going live. Students will gain first-hand experience of Sri Lanka where this programming language is being developed. This immersive experience brings MIT students and Sri Lankan students together for an intense month of study and exploration. Explore Sri Lanka’s heritage, culture, natural beauty, and people. Through this MISTI IAP program, you learn cross-cultural communication by living and working together with Sri Lanka students, and software engineers. As part of the team building and country orientation, the program starts of by visiting key cultural, heritage, historic, and wildlife sites in Sri Lanka. All expenses covered by sponsors.

More at https://goo.gl/Ei34Qj

Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MIT India Program,

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science


Contact: Mala Ghosh, E40-423, (617) 452-2479, mghosh@mit.edu

 

6.S089            Introduction to Quantum Computing

 

Amir Karamlou

MWF 3pm-5pm

Meets Jan; 36-155

Preregister on WebSIS and email instructor. Listeners permitted.

Prereq:  None

(U) 6 units Graded P/D/F

Quantum computation is a growing field at the intersection of physics, computer science, electrical engineering and applied math. This course provides an introduction to the basics of quantum computation. Specifically, we will cover some fundamental quantum mechanics (first week), survey quantum circuits (second week), and introduce important quantum algorithms (third week). In the final week we will survey advanced topics such as quantum error correction and quantum communication as well as applications to fields ranging from machine learning to chemistry. This course is self-contained and does not require any prior knowledge of quantum mechanics.

Contact Amir Karamlou, karamlou@mit.edu


 

6.S092            Crash Course for 6.006 Intro to Algorithms in 6+0+0+6 Hours

 

Ivan Ferreira Antunes Filho

January TBA, TBA

Preregister on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting.

Prereq: some knowledge of proofs

Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F

Cosponsored by the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB)

An overview of topics covered in 6.006, taught by experienced TAs, geared toward people who have some proofs knowledge, and want to prepare to take the class in the Spring, get some experience for algorithm questions in interviews, or who are curious about learning what all the hype is around algorithms. We will be covering topics like sort, data structures, hashing, graph search, and dynamic programming.

Contact ivanaf@mit.edu


 

6.S185            Wi-Fi 101

 

Prof. Steven B. Leeb, Patrick Kane (Cypress Semiconductor)

January TBA, 38-501 Engineering Design Studio

Preregister on WebSIS; Advanced Sign-Up Required

Permission of Instructor Required

Participants must attend all sessions

Prereq: Short readings before seminar meetings Permission of Instructor Required

Level: U3 units Graded P/D/F  

Limited to 30 participants.

This will be a three-day in-depth class focused on creating an IoT device using a Cypress WICED

Wi-Fi development kit and shield. Students will receive instruction, complete exercises, and homework to learn about the WICED Wi-Fi development environment and system, and the basics of Wi-Fi and the TCP/IP Network Stack, including TLS security. Exercises involve interacting with the outside world using buttons, LED's, displays, and analog sensors for temperature, humidity, and ambient light. "Cloud" applications protocols for communication will be discussed. Each student will build an IoT weather station that senses local weather conditions and publishes them on the web. Students will build a final project of their own design that involves sensor(s) and actuators and pushing sensor data to a cloud client. Some experience with C helpful.

Email sbleeb@mit.edu for permission before registering on WebSIS. Registering for this course is a FIRM commitment to attend; others will be turned away to make room for you.

Sponsor(s): Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Contact sbleeb@mit.edu.


 

_________________________________________________

6.S186 FPGA Digital Design Competition - 6 units

          

           Dr. Gim P. Hom

           Meets M-Th 1pm-3pm; January 8th -23rd, 32-144

           Labs open 3pm-9pm with staff available from 3pm-6pm

Preregister on WebSIS; Advanced Sign-Up Required

Prereqs: (enforced) 6.004 or 6.111

 

The design competition (teams of 2-3 students) consists of using a FPGA along with sensors and other peripherals to design and implement a working digital system.  This an opportunity to explore digital system design beyond typical course work during IAP.

The class will be divided into two groups: an advance group with FPGA experience and a group with limited experience with one hour non-over lapping lectures/workshop for each group. Project presentation and awards will be Jan 28 and 29.


 

 

6.S187            Code for Good

 

Victoria Juan

Jan 6-10, 13-17, 21-24, 27-31 time TBA; afternoon office hours 4 days a week; dinner and team presentations every Friday

 

Preregister on WebSIS.

Prerequisite: programming experience necessary

Level: U 6 unites

Graded P/D/F. Can be repeated for credit

Limited to 50 participants.

6.S187 provides opportunities for students to work on software-related projects with nonprofit organizations and provides them with technical expertise. Teams of 3-5 students will be matched with a nonprofit that has a project that is of interest to the student. Students will be mentored by a representative from the organization and subject instructors. Students can sign up as individuals or in groups. Project listings and detailed information available on the website:

http://codeforgood.mit.edu/programs/iap-class/   

Apply at http://codeforgood.mit.edu/apply

Contact: codeforgood@mit.edu


 

6.S190            Rapid Application Development

 

Daniela Field

Jan 22 – Jan 31, MWF 3pm-4pm, 34-303

Preregister on WebSIS and at url below by January 16th

No Coding Required.

Equipment: Windows laptop or Mac running a tool like Parallels

Limited to 25 people.

Rapid Application Development (RAD) using high productivity visual development platforms is fast becoming a standard in the enterprise. In this course, you will learn how to build web and mobile applications without having to write code. Upon completion of this course, you will gain an understanding of the basics of app development and have a sandbox for testing out new ideas. In addition, you will have an opportunity to take a rapid application developer certification exam and earn some bragging rights.

Sign up online at https://mitrad.mendixcloud.com/

Contact: jeffrey.goldberg@mendix.com


 

6.S191 Introduction to Deep Learning

 

Alexander Amini, Ava Soleimany

Mon Jan 27 - Fri Jan 31 1p-4pm, Room 32-123

Preregister on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed

Prereq: 18.06 and familiarity with Python helpful but not required  

Level U, 3 units, Graded P/D/F

Limited to 250

Intro to deep learning methods with applications to machine translation, image recognition, game playing, image generation and more. A collaborative course incorporating labs in TensorFlow and peer brainstorming along with lectures. Course concludes with project proposals with feedback from staff and panel of industry sponsors.

URL: http://introtodeeplearning.com

Contact: introtodeeplearning@mit.edu


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


IAP 2020 For-Credit Subjects:


Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

See Course 6 Non-Credit Activities

________________________________________

 

 


6.057  Introduction to MATLAB

 

Aaron Wubshet and Orhan Celiker

Meets Mon Jan 27 to Fri Jan 31 7pm-9pm in 32-123

Office Hours 1pm-3pm, 10-250

 

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting

Prereq: None

Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F  

 

Accelerated introduction to MATLAB and its popular toolboxes. Lectures are interactive, with students conducting sample MATLAB problems in real time. Includes problem-based MATLAB assignments. Students must provide their own laptop and software. Great preparation for classes that use MATLAB.

Web: https://learning-modules.mit.edu/class/index.html?uuid=/course/6/ia18/6.057

Contact: Orhan Celiker, 6.057-staff@mit.edu


 


6.058  Introduction to Signals, Systems, and Feedback Control -- Preparation for 6.003

 

Rhian Chavez

Jan 6 to Jan 31

Meets MTuWTh, January 6-January 31 2020; 7pm-8:30pm, 34-301

 

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting

Prereq: linear algebra or differential equations

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   

Limited to 30 participants.

 

 

Preparation for 6.003/6.011/6.302, focusing on several key concepts, including LTI systems, convolution, correlation, continuous and discrete Fourier series and transforms, filtering, sampling, modulation, Laplace and z-transforms, feedback/feedforward, PID control, and Bode plots. Course will include three to four problem sets and no exam.


Contact: rhianc@mit.edu.


 


6.117 Introduction to Electrical Engineering Lab Skills

 

            Sam Chinnery, Tim Magoun, Savannah Inglin

            Meets MW Jan 15- Jan 31; 4-231         

 

Preregister on Websis; no listeners permitted

Prereq: None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F

Limited to 17 participants; priority given to first-year students

 

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of practical electrical engineering (EE) in a relaxed, project-oriented environment. There are no prerequisites for this class; the only requirements are creativity and an interest in EE.


 

 


6.146  Mobile Autonomous Systems Laboratory: MASLAB

 

Noah Moroze, Yang Yan, Claire Traweek, Juan Salazar, Erons Ohienmhen

Meets January 6 - January 31 10am - 11pm; 38-600

 

Preregister on WebSIS and fill out form at maslab website. No listeners allowed.

Prereq:  None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Limited to 50 participants.

 

Autonomous robotics contest emphasizing technical AI, vision, mapping and navigation from a robot-mounted camera. Few restrictions are placed on materials, sensors, and/or actuators, enabling teams to build robots very creatively. Teams should have members with varying engineering, programming and mechanical backgrounds. Culminates with a robot competition at the end of IAP. The course begins with a week of instruction intended to serve the competitors as they start to design and prototype their systems. The bulk of the course consists of spending time in the lab building robots. This course is a great choice for all of those who would like to get hands-on experience in working on a team project. Enrollment is limited.

 

Web: http://maslab.mit.edu/

 

Contact: maslab-staff@mit.edu


 

 


6.147  The Battlecode Programming Competition

 

Diana Ma, Nate Foss, Arvid Lunnemark, Adam Zheng, Anne Ouyang, Ashley Lin, Crystal Su, Cynthia Du, Elizabeth Zou, Ivy Wang, Jerry Mao, Jessica Ding, Jett Wang, Marco Nocito, Nathan Kim, Pranali Vani, Quinn Bowers, Shayna Ahteck, Stephanie Fu, Teresa Gao, Vincent Huang, Younghun Roh, Zoë Marschner

Meets Mon-Fri, Jan 6-10, 13-17, 7:00pm-9:00pm, 32-155;

Final competition Feb 1, 6pm, TBA

Register on WebSIS and our website. Attendance optional (lectures and tournaments are recorded). Listeners welcome.

Prereq: 6.0001

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit

 

Artificial Intelligence programming contest in Java. Student teams program virtual robots to play Battlecode, a real-time strategy game. Assumes basic knowledge of programming, but not Java—lectures are held for the first two weeks to teach people the basics of Java and how to make your robots do intelligent things. Two teams of virtual robots, controlled by your code, roam the map gathering the resources necessary to build your army and win. Contestants learn to use artificial intelligence heuristics, pathfinding, and distributed algorithms. Competition culminates in a live Battlecode tournament.

Battlecode is a great opportunity to have fun and rapidly develop important software skills such as building a codebase from scratch, managing a large software system, and getting hands-on Java experience. For beginners, our lecture series (with dinner) walks you through creating your first bots and teaches more advanced techniques, and the Newbie Tournament—for first-time participants only—has its own share of the $30,000 prize pool.

 

Compete in teams of one to four students. First-year students are encouraged to participate. Learn more at battlecode.org. Lectures are optional but helpful. Knowledge of real-time strategy games or artificial intelligence is not necessary.

 

Web: https://battlecode.org

 

Contact: Nate Foss, battlecode@mit.edu


 

 


6.148  Web Lab: A Web Programming Class and Competition

 

Jessica Tang, Nikhil Singhil, Aaron Sipser, Alex Chen, Matthew Farejowicz, Cory Lynch, Shannen Wu, Kye Burchard, Johan Cervantes, Noah Raby

Meets MTuThF Jan 6-17, 11 am to 3 pm 10-250;

The remaining two weeks comprise grading, judging, and hackathons

Office Hours MW TBA Awards Ceremony TBA

 

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting.

Prereq: None

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Limited to 250 participants.

 

Students for teams of 1-3 people and learn how to build a functional and user-friendly website. Lectures and workshops teach everything you need to make a complete website. Advanced topics include React.js, layouts, and security. All teams eligible to enter in competition. Sites will be judged by industry experts. Over $20K in prizes will be awarded!

Beginners and experienced web programmers welcome, but previous programming experience recommended. You will receive the instructor's permission automatically by coming to lecture or by passing the first milestone check-off.

Web: http://weblab.mit.edu

Contact:  weblab-staff@mit.edu


 


6.176  Pokerbots Competition

 

David Amiraul, Shreyas Srinivasan, Stephen Otremba, Nilai Sarda, Gabrial Ramirez, Andy Zhu, Haijia Wan

Meets January 6, 8, 10, 13, 15, 17 1:00pm- 2:30pm, 4-370.  

Final presentation January 31.

 

Preregister on WebSIS and attend a class in the first week. Listeners allowed, space permitting

Prereq: 6.0001 or knowledge of the following: Java, C, C++. No poker experience needed.

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

 

6.176 is a computerized poker tournament. Teams of one to four students compete over the month to build the best possible autonomous poker player for our poker variant announced at the start of IAP. Showcase your programming and strategy skills, applying concepts from math, computer science, and game theory to win prizes from this year's $30,000 plus prize pool! Class provides instruction in bot programming, game theory, probability and statistics, and machine learning, over six lectures which take place during the first two weeks of IAP. Attendance not mandatory but highly encouraged; lecture notes are distributed through the course for people who wish to participate remotely. Concludes with a final competition event on January 31 and prizes. Sponsored by many of the world's top quantitative trading firms.

Web: https://pokerbots.org

Contact:  pokerbots@mit.edu


 

 


6.S086  Transcribing Prosodic Structure of Spoken Utterances with ToBI

 

Dr. Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel, Dr. Alejna Brugos (Boston University), Dr. Nanette Veilleux (Simmons College), Alison Langston (Wellesley College)

Meets TuTh Jan 8, 10, 15, 17, 22,24,29,31, 11:30am-1:30pm, 34-304

 

Sign up in advance by January 7th, and preregister on WebSIS. Listeners permitted.

Prereq: linguistics, acoustic or psycholinguistics or speech science background suggested

Level: U (6 units) Graded P/D/F

This course presents a tutorial on the ToBI (Tones and Break Indices) system, for labelling certain aspects of prosody in Mainstream American English (MAE-ToBI). The course is appropriate for undergrad or grad students with background in linguistics (phonology or phonetics), cognitive psychology (psycholinguistics), speech acoustics or music, who wish to learn about the prosody of speech, i.e. the intonation, rhythm, grouping and prominence patterns of spoken utterances, prosodic differences that signal meaning and phonetic implementation.

 

Cosponsored with HST.

 

Contact Stefanie Shattuck-Hufnagel, sshuf@mit.edu.


 

 


6.S087  Mathematical Methods for Multidimensional Statistics

 

               Farrell Eldrian Wu, Basil Saeed

               MWF January 6th-January 29th. 2pm-3:30pm, Room TBD

Prereq: 6.041A, 18.02.

Level: U (6 units) Graded P/D/F

Covers the mathematical foundations behind many of the methods used in multi-dimensional statistics, machine learning and data science. This includes multidimensional functions and spaces, vector and matrix calculus, constrained and unconstrained optimization and matrix decompositions.  Lectures develop the theoretical foundations of these concepts, while problem sets provide examples of their applications to statistics and machine learning. 6.041B helpful.

 

Contact: 6s087-staff@mit.edu


 

 


6.S088  Programming Enterprise Applications with Ballerina & WSO2 in Sri Lanka

 

Prof. Saman Amarasinghe, Dr. Sanjiva Weerawarana

Prereq: Programming Experience

Level: U  6 units P/D/F

Enrollment Limited to 10 participants. Advanced Sign-Up Required.

Students will travel to Sri Lanka

 

Ballerina is a concurrent, transactional, strongly typed programming language. It provides all the functionality expected of a modern, general-purpose programming language, but it is designed specifically for integration: it brings fundamental concepts, ideas and tools of distributed system integration into the language with direct support for providing and consuming network services, distributed transactions, reliable messaging, stream processing, security, and workflows.

This class will cover the following topics:

 


  • Intro to Ballerina

  • Architecture of scalable enterprise systems

  • Enterprise application security

  • Writing microservices

  • APIs and integrating applications

  • Scalable deployment architecture

  • Devops

Students will develop a practical scale system through the course of the class with the intention of a future completed version going live. Students will gain first-hand experience of Sri Lanka where this programming language is being developed. This immersive experience brings MIT students and Sri Lankan students together for an intense month of study and exploration. Explore Sri Lanka’s heritage, culture, natural beauty, and people. Through this MISTI IAP program, you learn cross-cultural communication by living and working together with Sri Lanka students, and software engineers. As part of the team building and country orientation, the program starts of by visiting key cultural, heritage, historic, and wildlife sites in Sri Lanka. All expenses covered by sponsors.

 

More at https://goo.gl/Ei34Qj

 

Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MIT India Program,

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science


Contact: Mala Ghosh, E40-423, (617) 452-2479, mghosh@mit.edu

 

 


6.S089  Introduction to Quantum Computing

 

              Amir Karamlou

MWF 3pm-5pm

Meets Jan; 36-155

 

Preregister on WebSIS and email instructor. Listeners permitted.

Prereq:  None

(U) 6 units Graded P/D/F

 

Quantum computation is a growing field at the intersection of physics, computer science, electrical engineering and applied math. This course provides an introduction to the basics of quantum computation. Specifically, we will cover some fundamental quantum mechanics (first week), survey quantum circuits (second week), and introduce important quantum algorithms (third week). In the final week we will survey advanced topics such as quantum error correction and quantum communication as well as applications to fields ranging from machine learning to chemistry. This course is self-contained and does not require any prior knowledge of quantum mechanics.

Contact Amir Karamlou, karamlou@mit.edu


 

 


6.S092  Crash Course for 6.006 Intro to Algorithms in 6+0+0+6 Hours

 

Ivan Ferreira Antunes Filho

January TBA, TBA

 

Preregister on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed, space permitting.

Prereq: some knowledge of proofs

Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F

 

Cosponsored by the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB)

An overview of topics covered in 6.006, taught by experienced TAs, geared toward people who have some proofs knowledge, and want to prepare to take the class in the Spring, get some experience for algorithm questions in interviews, or who are curious about learning what all the hype is around algorithms. We will be covering topics like sort, data structures, hashing, graph search, and dynamic programming.

 

Contact ivanaf@mit.edu


 

 


6.S185  Wi-Fi 101

 

Prof. Steven B. Leeb, Patrick Kane (Cypress Semiconductor)

January 21,22, and 23 9am-5pm, 38-501 Engineering Design Studio

 

Preregister on WebSIS; Advanced Sign-Up Required

Permission of Instructor Required

Participants must attend all sessions

Prereq: Short readings before seminar meetings Permission of Instructor Required

Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F  

Limited to 30 participants.

 

This will be a three-day in-depth class focused on creating an IoT device using a Cypress WICED

Wi-Fi development kit and shield. Students will receive instruction, complete exercises, and homework to learn about the WICED Wi-Fi development environment and system, and the basics of Wi-Fi and the TCP/IP Network Stack, including TLS security. Exercises involve interacting with the outside world using buttons, LED's, displays, and analog sensors for temperature, humidity, and ambient light. "Cloud" applications protocols for communication will be discussed. Each student will build an IoT weather station that senses local weather conditions and publishes them on the web. Students will build a final project of their own design that involves sensor(s) and actuators and pushing sensor data to a cloud client. Some experience with C helpful.

Email sbleeb@mit.edu for permission before registering on WebSIS. Registering for this course is a FIRM commitment to attend; others will be turned away to make room for you.

 

Sponsor(s): Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

 

Contact sbleeb@mit.edu.


 

_________________________________________________

6.S186 FPGA Digital Design Competition

          

           Dr. Gim P. Hom

           Meets M-Th 1pm-3pm; January 8th -23rd, 32-144

           Labs open 3pm-9pm with staff available from 3pm-6pm

Preregister on WebSIS; Advanced Sign-Up Required

Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F

Prereqs: (enforced) 6.004 or 6.111

 

The design competition (teams of 2-3 students) consists of using a FPGA along with sensors and other peripherals to design and implement a working digital system.  This an opportunity to explore digital system design beyond typical course work during IAP.

The class will be divided into two groups: an advance group with FPGA experience and a group with limited experience with one hour non-over lapping lectures/workshop for each group. Project presentation and awards will be Jan 28 and 29.

 

 

 


6.S187  Code for Good

 

Victoria Juan

Jan 6-10, 13-17, 21-24, 27-31 time TBA; afternoon office hours 4 days a week; dinner and team presentations every Friday

 

Preregister on WebSIS.

Prerequisite: programming experience necessary

Level: U 6 units

Graded P/D/F. Can be repeated for credit

Limited to 50 participants.

 

6.S187 provides opportunities for students to work on software-related projects with nonprofit organizations and provides them with technical expertise. Teams of 3-5 students will be matched with a nonprofit that has a project that is of interest to the student. Students will be mentored by a representative from the organization and subject instructors. Students can sign up as individuals or in groups. Project listings and detailed information available on the website:

http://codeforgood.mit.edu/programs/iap-class/   

 

Apply at http://codeforgood.mit.edu/apply

Contact: codeforgood@mit.edu


 

 


6.S190  Rapid Application Development

 

Daniela Field

Jan 22 – Jan 31, MWF 3pm-4pm, 34-303

 

Preregister on WebSIS and at url below by January 16th

No Coding Required.

Equipment: Windows laptop or Mac running a tool like Parallels

Limited to 25 people.

 

Rapid Application Development (RAD) using high productivity visual development platforms is fast becoming a standard in the enterprise. In this course, you will learn how to build web and mobile applications without having to write code. Upon completion of this course, you will gain an understanding of the basics of app development and have a sandbox for testing out new ideas. In addition, you will have an opportunity to take a rapid application developer certification exam and earn some bragging rights.

Sign up online at https://mitrad.mendixcloud.com/

Contact: jeffrey.goldberg@mendix.com


 

 


6.S191 Introduction to Deep Learning

 

Alexander Amini, Ava Soleimany

Mon Jan 27 - Fri Jan 31 1p-4pm, Room 32-123

 

Preregister on WebSIS and attend first class. Listeners allowed

Prereq: 18.06 and familiarity with Python helpful but not required  

Level U, 3 units, Graded P/D/F

Limited to 250

 

Intro to deep learning methods with applications to machine translation, image recognition, game playing, image generation and more. A collaborative course incorporating labs in TensorFlow and peer brainstorming along with lectures. Course concludes with project proposals with feedback from staff and panel of industry sponsors.

URL: http://introtodeeplearning.com

Contact: introtodeeplearning@mit.edu